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Techniques to Maximize Solar Panel Power Output

Trevor Barcelo - Product Line Manager - Battery Management Feb 3rd 2014

Two recent articles, "Energy Harvesting With Low Power Solar Panels" and  "Solar Battery Charger Maintains High Efficiency at Low Light", discuss how to efficiently harvest energy with low power solar panels. Both of these articles mention a concept known as maximum power, which in the context of solar panels is the ability to extract as much power as possible from the solar panel without collapsing the panel voltage. When discussing solar panels and power, terms such as Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) and Maximum Power Point Control (MPPC) are often used. Let’s look into the definition and meaning of these terms in more detail.

As can be seen in Figure 1, the output current of a solar panel varies nonlinearly with the panel voltage. Under short-circuit conditions the output power is zero since the output voltage is zero. Under open-circuit conditions the output power is zero since the output current is zero. Most solar panel manufacturers will specify the panel voltage at maximum power (Vmp). This voltage is typically around 70 – 80% of the panel’s open circuit voltage (Voc).In Figure 1 the maximum power is just under 140W with Vmp just under 32V and Imp just under 4.5A.

MPPT Blog Solar Panel PowerFigure 1. Solar panel I-V curve showing maximum power

 

Ideally, any system using a solar panel would operate that panel at its maximum power output. This is particularly true of a solar powered battery charger, where the goal, presumably, is to capture and store as much solar energy as possible in as little time as possible. Put another way, since we cannot predict the availability or intensity of solar power, we need to harness as much energy as possible while energy is available.

There are many different ways to try to operate a solar panel at its maximum power point. One of the simplest is to connect a battery to the solar panel through a diode. This technique is described here in the article "Energy Harvesting With Low Power Solar Panels". It relies on matching the maximum power output voltage of the panel to the relatively narrow voltage range of the battery. When available power levels are very low (approximately less than a few tens of milliwatts), this may be the best approach.

The opposite end of the spectrum is an approach that implements a complete Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) algorithm. There are a variety of MPPT algorithms, but most will have some ability to sweep the entire operating range of the solar panel to find where maximum power is produced. The LT8490 and LTC4015 are examples of integrated circuits that perform this function. The advantage of a full MPPT algorithm is that it can differentiate a local power peak from a global power maximum. In multi-cell solar panels, it is possible to have more than one power peak during partial shading conditions (see Figure 2). Typically, a full MPPT algorithm is required to find the true maximum power operating point. It does so by periodically sweeping the entire output range of the solar panel and remembering the operating conditions where maximum power was achieved. When the sweep is complete, the circuitry forces the panel to return to its maximum power point. In between these periodic sweeps, the MPPT algorithm will continuously dither the operating point to ensure that it operates at the peak.

 

MPPT Blog Solar Panel Power in ShadeFigure 2. Partially shaded solar panel showing multiple power maxima

An intermediate approach is something that Linear Technology calls Maximum Power Point Control (MPPC). This technique takes advantage of the fact that the maximum power voltage (VMP) of a solar panel does not, typically, vary much as the amount of incident light changes (see "Solar Battery Charger Maintains High Efficiency in Low Light" for more information). Therefore, a simple circuit can force the panel to operate at a fixed voltage and approximate maximum power operation. A voltage divider is used to measure the panel voltage and if the input voltage falls below the programmed level, the load on the panel is reduced until it can maintain the programmed voltage level. Products with this functionality include the LTC3105, LTC3129, LT3652(HV), LTC4000-1, and LTC4020. Note that the LT3652 and LT3652HV datasheet refer to MPPT rather than MPPC, but this is largely because Linear Technology had not come up with the MPPC terminology when the LT3652 product was released.

A final note about MPPC and the LTC3105 – the LTC3105 is a boost converter that can start up at the exceedingly low voltage of 0.25V. This makes the LTC3105 particularly well suited for boosting the output voltage of a “1S” solar panel (i.e. a solar panel whose output voltage is that of a single photovoltaic cell, even if the panel has many photovoltaic cells in parallel). With a 1S solar panel, there will be only one maximum power point – it is not possible to have multiple power peaks. In this scenario, differentiating between multiple maxima is not necessary.

In summary, many different ways of operating a solar panel at its maximum output operating condition exist. The panel can be connected to a battery (through a diode) whose voltage range is close to the maximum power voltage of the panel. A full MPPT algorithm, including periodic global sweeps to find the global maximum and a continuous dither to remain at that maximum (an example is the LT8490), can be used. Other products implement an input voltage regulation technique (MPPC) to operate a solar panel at a fixed operating voltage including the LTC3105, LTC3129, LT3652(HV), LTC4000-1 and the LTC4020. In the coming months, Linear Technology will introduce yet another technique for operating a solar panel at its maximum power point. Stay tuned!